Dental Care for Seniors

Advancing age puts many seniors at risk for a number of oral health problems, such as the following:

  • Darkened teeth.

    Caused, to some extent, by changes in dentin — the bone-like tissue that underlies the tooth enamel — and by a lifetime of consuming stain-causing foods and beverages.

  • Dry mouth.

    Dry mouth is caused by reduced saliva flow, which can be a result of cancer treatments that use radiation to the head and neck area, as well as certain diseases, such as Sjögren’s syndrome, and medications.

  • Diminished sense of taste.

    While advancing age impairs the sense of taste, diseases, medications, and dentures can also contribute to this sensory loss.

  • Root decay.

    This is caused by exposure of the tooth root to decay-causing acids. The tooth roots become exposed as gum tissue recedes from the tooth.

  • Gum disease.

    Caused by plaque and made worse by food left in teeth, use of tobacco products, poor-fitting bridges and dentures, poor diets, and certain diseases, such as anemia, cancer, and diabetes, this is often a problem for older adults.

  • Tooth loss.

    Gum disease is a leading cause of tooth loss.

  • Uneven jawbone.

    This is caused by tooth loss.

  • Denture-induced stomatitis.

    Ill-fitting dentures, poor dental hygiene, or a buildup of the fungus Candida albicans cause this condition, which is inflammation of the tissue underlying a denture.

  • Thrush.

    Diseases or drugs that affect the immune system can trigger the overgrowth of the fungus Candida albicans in the mouth.

Age in and of itself is not a dominant or sole factor in determining oral health. However, certain medical conditions, such as arthritis in the hands and fingers, may make brushing or flossing teeth difficult to impossible to perform. Medications you may be taking can also affect your oral health and may make a change in your dental treatment necessary. Pear Tree Home Care can provide transportation to dental visits for those important check-ups!

Dental care for seniors

 

Oral Hygiene Tips for Seniors

Daily brushing and flossing of your natural teeth are essential to keeping them in good oral health. Plaque can build up quickly on the teeth of seniors, and with our senior home care services we offer dental care for seniors because especially if oral hygiene is neglected could lead to tooth decay and gum disease.

To maintain good oral health, it’s important for all individuals — regardless of age — to:

  • Brush at least twice a day with a fluoride-containing toothpaste
  • Floss at least once a day
  • Visit your dentist on a regular schedule for cleaning and an oral exam

What Seniors Can Expect During a Dental Exam

If you’re a senior headed for a check up, your dentist should conduct a thorough history and dental exam. Questions asked during your dental history should include:

  • The approximate date of your last dental visit and reason for the visit
  • If you have noticed any recent changes in your mouth
  • If you have noticed any loose or sensitive teeth
  • If you have noticed any difficulty tasting, chewing, or swallowing
  • If you have any pain, discomfort, sores, or bleeding in your mouth
  • If you have noticed any lumps, bumps, or swellings in your mouth

Dental treatment needs in seniors

During your oral exam, your dentist will check the following:your face and neck (for skin discoloration, moles, sores); your bite (for any problems in how your teeth come together while opening and closing your mouth); your jaw (for signs of clicking and popping in the temporomandibular joint); your lymph nodes and salivary glands (for any sign of swelling or lumps); your inner cheeks (for infections, ulcers, traumatic injuries); your tongue and other interior surfaces — floor of the mouth, soft and hard palate, gum tissue (for signs of infection or oral cancer); and your teeth (for decay, condition of fillings,  and cracks).

If you wear dentures or other appliances, your dentist will ask you a few questions about when you wear your dentures and when you take them out (if removable). He or she will also look for any irritation or problems in the areas in the mouth that the appliance touches, and examine the denture or appliance itself (looking for any worn or broken areas).

Financial Aid for Seniors’ Dental Care

If you are a senior on a limited or fixed income and can’t afford regular dental care, many dentists offer their services at reduced fees through dental society-sponsored assistance programs. Since aid varies from one community to another, call your local dental society for information about where you can find the nearest assistance programs and low-cost care locations (such as public health clinics and dental school clinics). Also, check your local phone book, the internet, or your local dental society.

The American Dental Association’s website (www.ada.org) provides links to state dental associations local societies, and state dental schools.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *